Beyond "Knee High by the 4th of July"

An experiment in vegetable gardening

The 3 R’s – Radishes, Raspberries, & Romaine

March 12th, 2013

Radishes

While waiting 2-3 weeks for my carrot seeds to sprout, I decided to move on to planting radishes because the seeds should sprout in 4-6 DAYS!

Since direct sowing radishes is the same as direct sowing carrots, I felt like a pro planting the more manageable sized radish seeds.   I only put in 4 rows so that I will have room to plant spinach in the same bed as a companion plant because according to Organic Gardening, “radishes attract leafminers away from the spinach [and] the damage the leafminers do to radish leaves doesn’t prevent the radishes from growing nicely underground.”

Radishes

Once the seeds were planted and gently, yet firmly, covered with soil, all that was left to do was mist the bed and start watching for the seedlings to pop up – hopefully by the end of the week!

Misting the radishes

Raspberries

Last season, I planted 3 raspberry plants that I ordered from an online nursery in Georgia because they were supposed to be particularly suited for North Carolina.  I paid $19.75 for each “jumbo” plant and sadly, not only didn’t they make it, they never showed any sign of life.

So this year, I decided to go with the $4.99 carton of raspberries (2 plants in each carton!) from my local Tractor Supply Company.  I went with three different varieties:  Harvest Gold, Brandywine, and Latham.

I planted the bare root plants exactly as instructed on the carton and made sure I watered them in very well.

Raspberries

Since raspberries are Bruce’s favorite fruit, he has fingers crossed that this season will be THE season for a huge harvest of raspberries.

Fingers crossed

Romaine lettuce

When I opened the bag of romaine lettuce seeds and saw that they were at least as small as the carrot seeds, I decided to direct sow only 2 rows from seed and then plant the rest of the bed with transplants from the garden center.  I scattered the seeds as thinly as I could in very shallow rows and covered them lightly.  Then Navi, the kitten, helped me “gently tamp” down the soil.

I filled out the rest of the bed with 3 rows of 3 transplants each and watered everything in, being careful to lightly mist the rows of seeds.  If I don’t let the seeds dry out, I can expect the seedling to emerge in 7-10 days.  Meanwhile, with any luck, the transplants will be well on their way to my salad bowl!

Romaine

 

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Beyond "Knee High by the 4th of July"

An experiment in vegetable gardening